LAPL Training


With the recent introduction of the new European Light Aircraft Pilot’s License (LAPL) microlights can offer a cheap route to the new license. The new LAPL offers most recreational pilots everything they will ever wish for in terms of ratings. 

Why train on a microlight?

It’s a simple question of economics. We can train you right up to the NPPL(M) at a fraction of the costs of training on an equivalent Group A aircraft. To then gain your LAPL(A) you will only require five hours flying time on a Group A aircraft. Once you have reached the required standard you would then be issued an SSEA rating to add to your NPPL. With this you then have the right to apply for a LAPL at a cost of around £45 to the CAA and a bit of form filling. You would then hold both an NPPL and a LAPL and can take advantage of the additional privileges that brings. In short you are likely to fly a similar number of hours but at a much reduced cost.

We are able to train pilots for an NPPL(M) Microlight rating. Pilots can then add an SSEA (Simple Single Engine Aircraft) rating to that NPPL. The SSEA rating comes with restrictions. It allows you to fly an aircraft of up to a maximum of four seats and a maximum take-off weight of two tonnes. However the SSEA rating is restricted to flights within the UK and also restricted to Annex 2 aircraft. These are typically aircraft flown on a permit to fly rather than on a full Certificate of Airworthiness. The new EASA LAPL however  allows you to fly any EASA aircraft within Europe as well as non EASA aircraft (annex 2) in the UK as long as they fall into the SSEA category.

Does a LAPL restrict your flying?

If you are purely a recreational pilot there are few benefits of training for the full JAR PPL. It requires more hours, a more costly and stringent medical and tighter currency requirements. The only benefit is it allows more ratings right up to commercial ratings to be added. The LAPL is always going to limit you to two tonnes, single engine and four seats. Most recreational pilots however never fly anything bigger due to the costs involved.

For more details about the NPPL (SSEA) read our conversion training section.